Can I Lose Custody Of My Child For Being Bipolar?

What can cause me to lose custody of my child?

The most common reasons to lose custody can be attributed to the following: Neglect.

Physical abuse of the child.

Mental/emotional abuse of the child..

What would be considered an unfit mother?

What exactly is an unfit parent? The legal definition of an unfit parent is when the parent through their conduct fails to provide proper guidance, care, or support. Also, if there is abuse, neglect, or substance abuse issues, that parent will be deemed unfit.

How a mom can lose custody?

A Parent Who Abuses the Child or the Co-Parent Will Lose Custody. This applies not only to physical abuse, but to emotional or mental abuse. A parent found to be abusive can not only lose custody, but also the right to visitation (also called parenting time).

When should you seek full custody?

The clearest reason to ask for sole custody is to protect your child from physical harm, especially if the other parent has a history of any of the following issues: ABUSE: If a parent has assaulted or sexually abused the other parent or any child, this presents an obvious danger to their child.

What makes a mother unfit in the eyes of the court?

Factors that can lead a court to deem a parent unfit include: Instances of abuse or neglect; Willing failure to provide the child with basic necessities or needs; Abandonment of the child or children; or.

How can a man win custody battle?

1. Try to Negotiate – Before going to court for a lengthy and expensive custody battle, fathers will want to consider sitting down with the mother of the child and trying to negotiate a parenting agreement or parenting plan (also known as a custody judgment in some states).

What is considered unfit living conditions for a child?

Fixtures, Furniture, Equipment and Supplies: toilet not in working condition, garbage accessible to children, unsafe fireplace or heaters that are in use, unsafe water temperature, condition of bedding or towels is unsanitary, furniture is broken and could cause injury if used.

Can bipolar disorder affect child custody?

If you are a Bipolar parent seeking custody, it doesn’t have to be a futile effort. With competent legal counsel and medical and familial support, this battle can be won.

Is bipolar inherited from the mother or father?

Bipolar disorder may also be genetic or inherited. However, it will usually not be passed to children. About one in 10 children of a parent with bipolar disorder will develop the illness.

What should you not do during a custody battle?

9 Things to Avoid During Your Custody BattleAVOID VERBAL ALTERCATIONS WITH EX-SPOUSE AND/OR CHILDREN. … AVOID PHYSICAL CONFRONTATION WITH EX-SPOUSE AND/OR CHILDREN. … AVOID EXPOSING YOUR CHILDREN TO NEW PARTNERS. … AVOID CRITICIZING THE OTHER PARENT TO LEGAL PARTIES, FAMILY, OR FRIENDS. … AVOID NEGLECTING CHILD SUPPORT PAYMENTS AND/OR AGREED UPON PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES.More items…•

Do I have the right to know who my child is around?

Each parent is entitled to know where the children are during visitations. They should also know if the children are left with other people such as babysitters or friends when the other parent is not there. … Both parents should realize that visitation schedules may change as children age and their needs change.

What are the 4 types of bipolar?

According to the American Psychiatric Association, there are four major categories of bipolar disorder: bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, cyclothymic disorder, and bipolar disorder due to another medical or substance abuse disorder.

What do judges look for in child custody cases?

Judges must decide custody based on “the best interests of the child.” The “best interests of the child” law requires courts to focus on the child’s needs and not the parent’s needs. The law requires courts to give custody to the parent who can meet the child’s needs best .

Can text messages be used in child custody court?

In family law cases, both sides will need to present evidence to the court to support their proposed property, support, and child custody orders. … As long as the text message is sent by one the opposing party, and is a statement against that party’s interest, it may be admissible in court.