Does over-working in the office impact your sexual life?

Working Yourself to Death: Long Hours Bring Risks

Does over-working in the office impact your sexual life?

July 16, 2018 — At 35, Jennifer was single and childless. She poured herself into her work. As a physical therapist who also was director of the department at a hospital, she says she regularly put in 60 to 75 hours a week.

“I was always working,” she says. “I could avoid the emptiness in my life. I saw a full caseload of patients, often more than those who worked for me,” she says. She also attended meetings, coached staff, did quality reviews and handled payroll and doctor relations.

Then came the fallout.

“My health effects were significant,” she says now. Her periods disappeared. She cracked a tooth from grinding her teeth, had she had chronic abdominal pain and extreme fatigue.

She had been getting help for what she says were her other issues: excess alcohol use and overeating. She noticed she wasn't making the progress that her colleagues in those 12-step programs were. She Googled “workaholics,” found Workaholics Anonymous, joined, and began to change her habits.

That was 5 years ago. Her workweek now is calmer, saner, and capped at 40 hours. The rest of her life is falling into place, too. “I'm now in a loving relationship; we've moved in together,” she says.

Jennifer now practices self-care, makes time for a massage, yoga and the gym, and has let go of “the obsession to talk about work,” she says

The turning point? She says she realized that work addiction, the other forms of addiction, can be fatal.

“If it doesn't kill me, it will keep me miserable the rest of my life,” she says she realized.

Many people still look at long hour hours on the job as proof of their work ethic. Some historians trace the work ethic to the Protestant Reformation in the 1500s, when working hard was thought to align with the values of their faith.

Americans who work full time log an average of 47 hours a week, according to a 2014 Gallup poll, and some, of course, put in many more hours.

While Americans to pride themselves on being the hardest workers around, it’s not necessarily true, according to global statistics from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Its 2014 report found that overall, Mexicans average 43 hours a week, compared with U.S. workers' 34.2 hours.

But in recent years, researchers have found that working long hours is linked with a variety of health issues, as Jennifer discovered. (Abiding by Workaholics Anonymous policy, she gives only her first name.) Among the ailments linked with long work hours are stroke, heart disease, mental health problems, diabetes, and abnormal heart rhythms.

Experts don't agree on whether all workaholics, or workers who put in long hours, are cut from the same cloth.

They debate: Is it the long work hours or the mentality of the workers that affects health? Some say those who work long hours by choice because they are “engaged” in work but not compulsive may escape the health consequences. And some people, of course, must work long hours just to make ends meet.

The health effects of working long hours depend on the type of worker you are, says Lieke ten Brummelhuis, PhD, assistant professor of management at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia.

She led a study, tracking 763 Dutch workers to see if she found a relationship between long work hours and things that can cause metabolic syndrome (a cluster of symptoms including high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and other problems).

Metabolic syndrome makes heart disease and diabetes more ly.

She found it was not a simple matter of hours. The people she terms “engaged,” who d their job and perhaps worked long hours but were not constantly worrying about it, didn't have the symptoms she tracked. “It was not really the behavior, it was the work mentality, the constant rumination about work” that had a bad effect on health, she says.

So who's who? An engaged workaholic may put in 12 hours, close their laptop, and go do something else, she says. A compulsive workaholic will put in the same 12 hours but remain anxious about some of the tasks or decisions after work hours are over.

Bryan Robinson, PhD, a psychologist in Asheville, NC, and author of the forthcoming book #Chill, says that  workaholism is about “how it grips you and takes over your life and debilitates you.”

“The research is overwhelming,” he says. “In my mind, there is no question that work addiction is a compulsive disorder. It kills people. In Japan, they have a name for it: karoshi. It means death from overwork.

“A true workaholic gets high from the adrenaline and cortisol, and [without work,] they go through withdrawal,” Robinson says. “We are talking about working to the extreme,” he says. “It's not just when you are in the office. It's the inability to turn it off,” such as thinking through a work problem while watching your kid's soccer game.

“A workaholic is someone who is on the ski slopes dreaming about being back in the office. A healthy worker is someone in the office who dreams about being on the ski slopes,” Robinson says.

Working too much not only leads to health issues, he says, but relationship problems. “It has the same undergirding dynamic as alcohol, food addiction, or compulsive gambling,” says Robinson, who says he is a former workaholic.

Many workaholics come from dysfunctional homes, he says. Often, those who have come from such environments feel they need to take charge of something to overcome the chaos, he says, and that becomes part of their personality. “Work becomes the coping mechanism,” Robinson says.

Chris Scruggs, 67, of San Antonio, TX, a lawyer turned pastor, works long hours but says his health is fine. When he worked at a large law firm, he regularly logged 70-hour weeks.

Now, his “retirement” career is serving as a pastor, and he usually works about 55 hours. “I don't work just for work's sake,” he says.

In his pastoral role, he needs to respond to needs such as unexpected funeral planning or other events that come up.

He says he has natural high energy and he takes care of his health, exercises regularly, eats a healthy diet, and keeps a healthy weight. In both legal practice and being a pastor, he says, you are not in control of your time.

Brian Weinberger, 61, an attorney in Agoura Hills, CA, agrees.

In professions such as medicine and the law, “we have people's lives in our hands” and often need to respond quickly to that need, whatever the hour of day. He logs 60 hours in a typical week.

“I enjoy what I do, and I take it seriously,” he says. He rates his health as fairly good, but he admits the stress sometimes makes him dizzy.

Another expert doesn't buy the idea that it's not the hours, it's all about mentality. In a published critique of the study by Brummelhuis, Jeffrey Pfeffer, PhD, the Thomas D.

Dee II professor of organizational behavior at Stanford University, pointed out what he sees as shortcomings of the research, such as studying only workers in the Netherlands, where employees tend to work fewer hours than in the U.S. and enjoy more vacation time.

“The idea that work hours, by themselves, are not consequential for health seems problematic,” writes Pfeffer, who wrote Dying for a Paycheck, a book about work and employee health. While work hours by themselves are not the single aspect that harms health, the effects of long work hours have been clear in many studies, he says.

Several recent studies buttress Pfeffer's points Among them: 

Diabetes risk: Putting in 45 or more hours a week raises the chance of having diabetes in women, but not men, according to researchers who tracked the health and work habits of more than 7,000 Canadians between ages 35 and 74 over 12 years.

“Women who worked 45 or more hours a week had a 63% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes over a 12-year period, compared to women working between 35 to 40,” says Mahee Gilbert-Ouimet, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Work and Health, Toronto, who led the study.

They found no such link in the men studied, she says, and in fact, “we see the opposite trend, though it was not statistically significant.”

She can't explain the lack of a link in men but speculates that “women might work more hours when all the household chores and family responsibilities are taken into account. We did not have the data to verify that, but it's plausible.

” Another factor, she says, is that most of the men working longer hours tended to have more physically demanding jobs than women had, and the activity may have protected them from getting diabetes.

The chronic stress of excess work hours may make it more ly to have abnormal hormones and raise insulin resistance, which can make diabetes more ly, Gilbert-Ouimet says.

Abnormal heart rhythm: Workers putting in 55 hours or more a week, compared with 35 or 40, had a 1.

4 times greater chance of having an abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation, according to a study of more than 85,000 men and women in Denmark, Sweden, Finland, and the U.K. Having atrial fibrillation raises the odds of having a stroke.

The link held even after researchers accounted for other things that make the illness more ly, such as age, sex, obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, and risky alcohol use.

Researchers say the higher risk they found is modest. They speculate that the long hours lead to an abnormal autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary actions such as the beating of the heart.

Heart disease and stroke: Other researchers looked at 25 previously published studies involving more than 600,000 workers who were healthy at the start. Compared with working 35 to 40 hours, working 55 or more hours raised the odds of having a stroke by 33% and the chance of heart disease by 13% over a 7-year span.

Psychiatric disorders: Workaholism often happens along with mental health issues, Norwegian researchers found after looking at more than 16,000 adults. They used standard scales to find that about 8% of participants met the definition of workaholics.

Compared with non-workaholics, workaholics were more ly to have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), anxiety, and depression. Taking work to the extreme may reflect deeper emotional or psychological issues, the researchers say.

Work environments are changing, Robinson says. “Employers are starting to say, 'We don't want workaholics,’ ” and workaholics don't give employers a better bang for the buck, he says.

In the long run, he says, workers who take and enjoy vacations and other down time — without being chained to their phones and other devices — are more productive and less prone to burnout and health issues. Employers, as well as workers, are beginning to believe this, he says.

Jennifer, physical therapist and volunteer, Workaholics Anonymous.

Chris Scruggs, lawyer turned pastor, San Antonio, TX.

Brian Weinberger, attorney, Agoura Hills, CA.

Lieke ten Brummelhuis, PhD, assistant professor in management, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia.

Mahee Gilbert-Ouimet, PhD, postdoctoral fellow, Institute for Work & Health, Toronto.

Bryan Robinson, PhD., psychologist, Asheville, NC; professor emeritus, University of North Carolina Charlotte; author of the forthcoming book #Chill.

BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care: “Adverse effect of long work hours on incident diabetes in 7065 Ontario workers followed for 12 years.”

European Heart Journal: “Long working hours as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation: a multi-cohort study.”

Lancet: “Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of published an unpublished data for 603,838 individuals.”

PLOS One: “The Relationships between Workaholism and Symptoms of Psychiatric Disorders: A Large-Scale Cross-Sectional Study.”

Academy of Management Discoveries: “Beyond Nine to Five: Is Working to Excess Bad for Health?”

Academy of Management Discoveries: “Work Hours and Health: A Comment on 'Beyond Nine to Five.' ”

Academy of Management Discoveries: “The Difference Between Working Long Hours and Workaholism: Response to Commentary on 'Beyond Nine to Five.'”

© 2018 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/balance/stress-management/news/20180716/working-yourself-to-death-long-hours-bring-risks

Why Work Stress Is Bad for Your Relationships

Does over-working in the office impact your sexual life?

Source: Caio_triana/Pixabay

Work-life balance is all about finding ways to prioritize work while also prioritizing life outside of work (for example: health, pleasure, family, leisure).

Although work-life balance looks a little different for everyone, a lack of work-life balance tends to be a common problem. Sometimes our problems at work bleed into our home lives, even when we try to keep them separate.

If you have noticed that the challenges you face at work seem to be impacting your relationship at home, there is a model to help you make sense of why and how this happens.

But first, let’s talk through two types of work-life conflict you might experience:

Work-family conflict happens when role pressures at work hamper functioning at home. For example, when working late several nights in a row to complete an important but time consuming project, you might fail to do your fair share of the housework.

This type of conflict is more ly to happen to people who are Type A (ambitious, organized, high energy, competitive, impatient), have negative emotions or outlook, experience job demands including work pressure and/or having to “fake” emotions staying positive even when dealing with rude customers, have an undesirable work time schedule, or feel overloaded at work.

Work-family conflict is related to hostile interactions between partners as well as reduced marital and life satisfaction.

Family-work conflict happens when roles at home interfere with work. A good example of this is when you have a sick child and have to leave work to get him/her from daycare. Your role as parent is interfering with your role as employee.

Source: lukasbieri/pixabay

The spillover-crossover model

Both of these types of conflict may lead to spillover and crossover, ideas central to the spillover-crossover model.

The spillover-crossover model provides another way to look at the push and pull people experience between work and life is. This model, developed by Drs.

Arnold Bakker and Evangelia Demerouti, explains how and why stress at work can bleed into our home life, and even impact our partner’s wellbeing. Let’s break it down:

Spillover happens when you bring your work stress home with you and end up working at home, or worrying and ruminating about work at home. Spillover is an individual experience. The basic idea is that we don’t always leave work at work and instead end of focusing on work at the expense of focusing on our social or family lives when away from work.

Crossover happens when the work stress you brought home starts to affect your partner. The stress is from your job is effectively crossing over to a completely separate person.

This can happen through the transfer of negative emotions or even burnout (complete exhaustion due to overwork and job stress). Researchers have found that exposure to a burned-out partner increases one’s own level of burnout.

This is an interactive process between two people.

The model says that spillover leads to crossover. Spillover is contained within one person. When you feel stressed at work, you might also feel stressed at home. Crossover by definition must impact more than one person. In a study of spillover crossover among dual-earner parents, Dr.

Demerouti and her team found that job demands impact life satisfaction and that experiencing work-family conflict explains how job demands influence life satisfaction. In other words, experiencing more job demands leads to increased work-family conflict which then impacts life satisfaction.

Fortunately, the spillover-crossover model is just as ly to work in a positive direction as a negative one. It is not all about bringing stress home and burdening your partner.

Positive experiences at work satisfaction can spillover to feeling more satisfied at home which can then influence your partner’s satisfaction in a positive way.

Other attributes research has shown spillover and crossover include quality of life, autonomy, social support, work engagement, and vigor.

This model shows that the good aspects of work can positively influence our lives at home and our partners. Perhaps more important however is to be aware of how the negative aspects of work can influence the rest of our lives and the people closest to us.

Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/conscious-communication/201803/why-work-stress-is-bad-your-relationships

Coping with stress at work

Does over-working in the office impact your sexual life?

Everyone who has ever held a job has, at some point, felt the pressure of work-related stress. Any job can have stressful elements, even if you love what you do. In the short-term, you may experience pressure to meet a deadline or to fulfill a challenging obligation. But when work stress becomes chronic, it can be overwhelming — and harmful to both physical and emotional health.

Unfortunately, such long-term stress is all too common. In fact, APA’s annual Stress in Americadxdyybbydwutetsusbwuxzyvsfzxbvqcu survey has consistently found that work is cited as a significant source of stress by a majority of Americans. You can't always avoid the tensions that occur on the job. Yet you can take steps to manage work-related stress.

Common Sources of Work Stress

Certain factors tend to go hand-in-hand with work-related stress. Some common workplace stressors are:

  • Low salaries.
  • Excessive workloads.
  • Few opportunities for growth or advancement.
  • Work that isn't engaging or challenging.
  • Lack of social support.
  • Not having enough control over job-related decisions.
  • Conflicting demands or unclear performance expectations.

Effects of Uncontrolled Stress

Work-related stress doesn't just disappear when you head home for the day. When stress persists, it can take a toll on your health and well-being.

A stressful work environment can contribute to problems such as headache, stomachache, sleep disturbances, short temper and difficulty concentrating. Chronic stress can result in anxiety, insomnia, high blood pressure and a weakened immune system.

It can also contribute to health conditions such as depression, obesity and heart disease.

Compounding the problem, people who experience excessive stress often deal with it in unhealthy ways such as overeating, eating unhealthy foods, smoking cigarettes or abusing drugs and alcohol.

Taking Steps to Manage Stress

  • Track your stressors. Keep a journal for a week or two to identify which situations create the most stress and how you respond to them. Record your thoughts, feelings and information about the environment, including the people and circumstances involved, the physical setting and how you reacted. Did you raise your voice? Get a snack from the vending machine? Go for a walk? Taking notes can help you find patterns among your stressors and your reactions to them.
  • Develop healthy responses. Instead of attempting to fight stress with fast food or alcohol, do your best to make healthy choices when you feel the tension rise. Exercise is a great stress-buster. Yoga can be an excellent choice, but any form of physical activity is beneficial. Also make time for hobbies and favorite activities. Whether it's reading a novel, going to concerts or playing games with your family, make sure to set aside time for the things that bring you pleasure. Getting enough good-quality sleep is also important for effective stress management. Build healthy sleep habits by limiting your caffeine intake late in the day and minimizing stimulating activities, such as computer and television use, at night.
  • Establish boundaries. In today's digital world, it's easy to feel pressure to be available 24 hours a day. Establish some work-life boundaries for yourself. That might mean making a rule not to check email from home in the evening, or not answering the phone during dinner. Although people have different preferences when it comes to how much they blend their work and home life, creating some clear boundaries between these realms can reduce the potential for work-life conflict and the stress that goes with it.
  • Take time to recharge. To avoid the negative effects of chronic stress and burnout, we need time to replenish and return to our pre-stress level of functioning. This recovery process requires “switching off” from work by having periods of time when you are neither engaging in work-related activities, nor thinking about work. That's why it's critical that you disconnect from time to time, in a way that fits your needs and preferences. Don't let your vacation days go to waste. When possible, take time off to relax and unwind, so you come back to work feeling reinvigorated and ready to perform at your best. When you're not able to take time off, get a quick boost by turning off your smartphone and focusing your attention on non-work activities for a while.
  • Learn how to relax. Techniques such as meditation, deep breathing exercises and mindfulness (a state in which you actively observe present experiences and thoughts without judging them) can help melt away stress. Start by taking a few minutes each day to focus on a simple activity breathing, walking or enjoying a meal. The skill of being able to focus purposefully on a single activity without distraction will get stronger with practice and you'll find that you can apply it to many different aspects of your life.
  • Talk to your supervisor. Employee health has been linked to productivity at work, so your boss has an incentive to create a work environment that promotes employee well-being. Start by having an open conversation with your supervisor. The purpose of this isn't to lay out a list of complaints, but rather to come up with an effective plan for managing the stressors you've identified, so you can perform at your best on the job. While some parts of the plan may be designed to help you improve your skills in areas such as time management, other elements might include identifying employer-sponsored wellness resources you can tap into, clarifying what's expected of you, getting necessary resources or support from colleagues, enriching your job to include more challenging or meaningful tasks, or making changes to your physical workspace to make it more comfortable and reduce strain.
  • Get some support. Accepting help from trusted friends and family members can improve your ability to manage stress. Your employer may also have stress management resources available through an employee assistance program (EAP), including online information, available counseling and referral to mental health professionals, if needed. If you continue to feel overwhelmed by work stress, you may want to talk to a psychologist, who can help you better manage stress and change unhealthy behavior.

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Stress, Overwork, and Insecurity are Driving the Invisible Workplace Accident Rate

Does over-working in the office impact your sexual life?

Nurses providing hospital care, delivery people delivering food to homes, domestic workers cleaning hotel rooms, office workers accumulating overtime hours, restaurant servers taking on two or three jobs to make minimum wage: no one would consider these to be dangerous occupations. And yet today, more than ever, they have become high-risk jobs.

In 2019, you no longer have to hang from scaffolding to risk your life on the job. Precariousness, stress, and overwork can also make you sick, and even kill you, at a much higher rate than accidents.

Of all of the work-related deaths recorded each day (7,500 according to the International Labour Organization, or ILO), less than 14 percent occur at the workplace. The vast majority (approximately 6,500) were the result of long-term physical (circulatory, respiratory, professional cancer) or mental illness.

We work in safer environments than we did 30 years ago but the physical and emotional health of workers remains fragile.

Traditional risks persist – the European Union, for example, has seen a recent uptick in fatal accidents in the construction sector – while at the same time, emerging risks, psychosocial risks, and risks associated with the digital economy are increasing. These include stress, fatigue, and harassment related to the organization of work, working hours, demands, and uncertainty.

“Psychosocial risks are the great pandemic of this century and they are related to the precarious conditions of the labour market,” warns Ana García de la Torre, secretary of occupational health of Spain’s General Union of Workers (UGT).

The union’s latest prevention campaign focuses precisely on “invisible” threats such as overloading and hyperconnectivity. “They are not new, we’ve been suffering from them for a while, but they have definitely gotten worse.”

Today’s greatest workplace risk isn’t falling or infectious agents, which are more or less under control, but increasing pressure, precarious contracts, and working hours incompatible with life, which, bit by bit, continue to feed the invisible accident rate that does not appear in the news.

In today’s frenetic and competitive market, stress has become almost as common at the office as the coffee machine. It is the second most common workplace health problem and is responsible for half of all absences.

It is most common in the service and care sectors, jobs with a high percentage of female employees, where relationships with people can be exhausting.

“The idea that the customer is always right has been very damaging to the wellbeing of many workers,” says José Antonio Llosa, PhD in Psychology at the University of Gijón.

According to Llosa, at the other end of the spectrum, the most affected employees are highly skilled workers who face “serious levels of demand for excellence.”

Work-related stress is primarily the result of overwork and an increase in the use of technology. According to the ILO’s most recent health and safety report, 36 percent of the world’s employees work too much (more than 48 hours a week), and all of this overtime puts them at risk.

“There is a close correlation between excessive working hours and accidents at work,” the report warns. “Excessive working hours are associated with the chronic effects of fatigue, which can lead to cardiovascular disease, gastrointestinal disorders, high rates of anxiety, depression, and sleeping disorders.”

Ana Isabel Mariño, labour and social security inspector, acknowledges that these psychosocial risks, combined with ergonomic risks related to harmful movements and postures, are “the most serious today.

” However, companies still fail to take preventative measures. “There are usually no protocols in place, just as there are no protocols for dealing with harassment and even sexual harassment,” says Mariño.

Measures are lacking for both raising awareness within companies and updating current legislation. According to UGT, “psychosocial risks are still not included in the catalogue of professional illnesses.” For this reason, many companies do not include them in their risk analyses and they are ignored in medical examinations.

Over the last year there have been some minor advances “such as the recognition of occupational burnout,” says Llosa. “However, we have to be careful with labels.

It’s not the fault of the worker who doesn’t know how to deal with the stress,” she explains.

The problem cannot be remedied with anti-anxiety drugs, exercise, or meditation but must be dealt with at the source by changing the way that work is organized.

Job insecurity, precarious contracts, and low wages have created a new category of working poor. Today, in addition to earning low wages, they are also more ly to become sick or injured.

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“This flexibility and mobility, this extreme and constant obligation to leave your zone of comfort without any type of security results in extreme physical and emotional exhaustion. Job insecurity is linked to poor mental health outcomes with higher rates of depression, anxiety and despondency. It also impacts the way people organize their lives and frustrates their plans,” says Llosa.

Llosa, who is participating in a research project on precariousness and mental health, also warns of a direct link between job insecurity and drug consumption and between perpetual uncertainty and thoughts of suicide. “Obviously suicidal thoughts do not necessarily equate to attempts, but they are indicative of a very deep malaise.”

At the same time, precariousness has physical consequences. “The number of accidents has increased in absolute terms and in severity since 2013, coinciding with increased labor flexibility,” adds Mariño in reference to the figures for workplace accidents in Spain.

The most vulnerable workers are those employed on a temporary or casual basis, those subcontracted through agencies and the false self-employed. ILO data shows the rate of accidents for these employees to be much higher than for any others.

In addition, they are hired to do the most dangerous work, have less access to training, are more susceptible to harassment and generally have a harder time asserting their rights. They are consistently faced with a choice between health and work, between enduring pain or running the risk of not being called back.

The most striking example is that of workers for digital platforms and in particular delivery workers and messengers who are forced by multinational companies to declare themselves self-employed in order to receive a salary. This is why many of them lose their rights, including risk prevention, in a dangerous occupation.

“We receive photos of accidents every day.

We drive for shifts of three, four, five hours at a time, the probability of having an accident is high and the company puts us under constant pressure to arrive on time.

In addition, we don’t receive any training in risk prevention,” complains Nuria Soto, spokesperson for the labor union Riders x Derechos, which represents delivery people in Barcelona.

Last May, a courier in Barcelona, 23-year-old Nepalese national Pujan Koirala, lost his life while making a delivery. Koirala did not have a work visa and was working under the account of another rider.

According to Soto, such arrangements are commonplace. “There are tons of undocumented migrants renting or borrowing accounts. The company is aware of this but it suits them.

These workers are the last to claim any rights.”

According to Riders x Derechos, since Koirala’s death, six other delivery workers have died in Europe and Latin America “and in none of these cases have the companies taken responsibility.

” That’s why they are demanding to be recognized as salaried workers (several courts in Spain have already ruled in their favor) so they don’t have to continue risking their lives on a job-to-job basis as part of a working model that belongs to the 19th century rather than the 21st.

Accidents not only negatively impact workers but also the companies that employ them and society in general. Bad health and safety practices cost around 3.94 percent of global GDP every year. “That’s why prevention has to be integrated into business operations early on,” says Alejandro Pérez, professor of occupational risks at the ICADE Business School in Madrid.

“I teach my students that they have to assess the risks, inform their workers, provide training, and monitor health. Illnesses have to be addressed as soon as they appear, including stress, so that anyone suffering from it can receive the same protection as someone with a twisted ankle. The problem is that we are still more reactive than preventative,” he adds.

The ILO recognizes that more effort is required in order to anticipate risks and strengthen international standards.

In the coming decades, the world will have to face major challenges when it comes to occupational safety, including an ageing population, technological risks, the toxic potential of nanomaterials, and climate change, as well as fundamental changes to the way that work is organized.

There is no point in designing algorithms to predict accidents when the labor market itself has become the primary risk factor. As Mariño insists: “The key to improving prevention is slowing down processes, better regulating hours, and curbing this insane competition.” Protecting workers is impossible in a market that is unrestrained and insecure by nature.

Source: https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/09/22/stress-overwork-and-insecurity-are-driving-invisible-workplace-accident-rate

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