The Best Street Style From Pitti Uomo Spring/Summer 2020

The Best Street Style From Pitti Uomo Spring/Summer 2020

It's the official start of the Spring/Summer 20 season, so let's take a look at the most influential trends coming Florence.The Fashion Snoops photography team was ready on site to capture the the best of the trends. 

SURF PSYCHEDELIA

It's a delightfully blurry vision of summer, with fresh new ways to interpret late 60s psychedelia. From eye-popping tie dyes in abstract prints to neon paint strokes, the head-to-toe look is fresh and anything but minimal. It's a nice contrast to the otherwise solid techno design themes currently in menswear. 

URBAN EXPLORER

After several seasons of utility hiding in the background, it's back front and center, but in a much more refined way.

With a mix of urban sophistication and rugged preparedness, this theme is one to keep an eye on as sportier styles become more tailored and relaxed.

While the pockets may be oversized and the trim and details may be outdoors-ready, the look is meant to emphasize the importance of being ready for anything in an uncertain world.

SWEATER POLO

There's a whole new level of elegance when it comes to warm weather knits. Matching a decidedly retro mood for next season, the sweater polo was by far and away one of the most important key items seen in Florence. The finer the gauge the better, and the best colors all had a vintage-y vibe, with warm casted greens, oranges and taupes leading the way. 

HIGHLIGHTER HUES

As far as color trends go, super bright highlighter hues led the way in Florence. While they still mostly dominate activewear and other techno surfaces, we started to see the colors pivot to more tailored styles as well. Two-tone neons were some of the most interesting examples, where one ultra intense tone is styled with a monochromatic hue that's slightly more subdued. 

CAMP SHIRT 

Patterned camp shirts are one of the best seasonal essentials, and with “dad style” being so cool at the moment, it's no wonder that almost every brand had some variation on the trend. The best shirts were the ones with a silkier finish, a watered-down color story, and a dreamy, abstract approach to tropical motifs. 

TECHNO SHELL PARKA 

Another nod to summertime utility was the techno parka, which came in a variety of jewel tones and saturated neutrals. These tissue- weight nylon shells featured plenty of function, while also maintaining their breezy lightness. A new addition to the styles for S/S20 was the use of contrasting industrial straps as a design overlay. 

CHORE BLAZER 

Blazers and sport coats that can be worn as casually as a sweatshirt were a big trend in Florence. Completely deconstructed in nature, these chore jackets are being updated in seasonal colors, a higher button stance overall, and even showcasing novel ways to update super traditional suiting plaids and checks. 

MUTED PASTELS

As the anthithesis to the highlighter neons also seen in Florence, these muted yet impactful pastels came right from the most important runways. As the perfect complement to crisp cotton poplins and technical nylons, these powdery pastels add a unexpected and much-needed complexity to active-inspired styles and summer tailoring. 

Want to see the Spring/Summer 2020 Street Style trends coming Florence? Click here >> 

TREND REPORT PROVIDED BY

Fashion Snoops is a global creative agency that helps brands and companies harness future trends and act on the opportunities they bring. FS provides consulting services to global fashion and consumer product brands, as well as SaaS solutions wired for creators – allowing them to create smarter.

Headquartered in NYC, Fashion Snoops has clients and contributors in 50 countries around the globe. For more information visit, fashionsnoops.com

Source: https://www.fashionframeworks.com/project/springsummer-2020-trends-florence-june-2019

CEO Raffaello Napoleone On The Evolution of Pitti Uomo: “The Good International Community Of Menswear Is Here”

The Best Street Style From Pitti Uomo Spring/Summer 2020

FLORENCE, ITALY – JANUARY 08: Gentlemen, wearing suits, are seen at Fortezza Da Basso on January 08, … [+] 2020 in Florence, Italy. (Photo by Claudio Lavenia/Getty Images)

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When Raffaello Napoleone joined Pitti Immagine—the Italian non-profit dedicated to promoting the fashion industry  in 1989—the fashion landscape was a dramatically different space.

Sustainability wasn’t on anybody’s mind, Instagram and influencers brands now use to promote their clothes didn’t exist, magazines were the main platform to learn about fashion, ecommerce wasn’t a thing, and malls were in their prime. 

Now the market is bigger than ever before with an endless stream of brands. Last week in Florence, Italy from January 7 to 10, Pitti presented the 97th edition of Pitti Uomo, the trade show dedicated to men’s fashion.

Some 21,400 buyers attended the show, with approximately 8,300 coming from abroad.

In those four days Brioni celebrated its 75th anniversary at Palazzo Gerini with musicians dressed in the label playing classical music, Woolrich marked 180 years in the business, Telfar held a sumptuous bacchanalian affair before its fashion show, Dao-Yi Chow unveiled his first collection for Sergio Tacchini, Stefano Pilati showed his anti-influencer affair for Random Identities, and Luke and Lucie Meier returned to the city where they met to show their men’s collection for Jil Sander, and K-Way had its first runway show.  

I asked Pitti CEO Napoleone about the evolution of Pitti Uomo, the benefits of showing there, and why trade shows are still necessary during a retail decline.  

MILAN, ITALY – JUNE 14: Raffaello Napoleone attends the Ermenegildo Zegna fashion show during the … [+] Milan Men's Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2020 on June 14, 2019 in Milan, Italy. (Photo by Jacopo Raule/Getty Images)

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How has the fashion world changed since you joined Pitti in 1989?

As you can imagine, very deeply. In ‘89, the Berlin Wall was on. So from then to 2020 a lot of things changed. Fashion used to be in those years, of course for men and women, especially full of creativity, always, but menswear will much more stiff.

There were different rules in the way men used to appear. Going to work, and less options compared to what is happening now. And I can say this following the turnover of the Italian menswear industry. It's growing a lot and is very close to the turnover.

I'm speaking just about Italian manufacturing turnover, is growing much faster than women and very close to the turnover of the womenswear 12 billion euros, the turnover in women now and the man is very close to 10 billion euros.

This means that what we represent here at Pitti Uomo now has much more options and offer much more options to the retailers and to the consumers. 

How has Pitti evolved?

I remember very well, at the very beginning when I arrived here 30 years ago that it was mainly the formalwear with some sportswear and we had much less sections. Now we are very close to 16 sections.

And you have from a shoe and accessory point of view from a clothing point of view to a knitwear point of view. Sustainability is something today, this is not anymore a word, but is something very real.

When I arrived there were 400 to 450 exhibitors. Now we have more than 1,200. 

How does Pitti Uomo differentiate itself from the other men’s fashion weeks?

Last season somebody spoke about Pitti it was fashion week. We too, because it was quite that not because we want to be a fashion week. We are not a fashion week. We don't have a calendar of 10 or 15 fashion shows per day.

We are a trade show with the main lines and main strategy about cultural fashion, about inventing it where you have the chance to present new projects the Telfar project this  evening and Stefano Pilati.

This is an example of what we want to do because there are enough fashion shows worldwide and we don't want to enter that can also because we are not in that part of the market.

How do you select the guest designers and projects for each Pitti?

We travel a lot, we look worldwide, where we can find something new and interesting for the retailer and for the consumer. We try to understand which is exactly the most creative and innovative and new proposal that fits with the project as such of Pitti. We are not looking for somebody just to show here. We ask for something unique.

How would a brand benefit from showing here?

You have to ask them first of all, but generally speaking, the benefit is over 2000 buyers, 47 percent international, opening new markets if you have a new collection to show. There are huge advantages. 

How can you stand out against 1,200 exhibitors if you’re a smaller brand?

We have several sections, so it depends from the stature of each retailer. Of course, we have the very well known brands Brioni or Herno, the big ones. Joop! from Germany, or the Lagerfeld.

But there are also many different offers, different pricing different. There's so many options. It depends. Fortunately, in fashion, we have many options of distribution.

We have multi brands, mono brands, department stores, malls, so you need also to add something. The world is quite big and the market is growing.

What makes a brand suitable for Pitti?

To be desirable by the market. 

With the decline of brick-and-mortar retail, why are trade shows still necessary?

If you don't understand internationally, what's going on, you have to be here, otherwise you don't understand. Fashion week doesn’t give this message. 

When did you notice the rise of the Pitti dandy?

It started without any effort from our side because the good international community of menswear is here. You don't have any other appointment worldwide with 20 to 23,000 buyers with a community of suppliers, PR reach 34,000 people in one place for four days concentrated in the fortress and small town that is an open air showroom. 

Were people dressing up for the cameras as much before social media came into play? 

They started before the social media success. One is the pleasure of the dressing in a very peculiar way. The other is the evolution that we have with the people taking pictures Scott Schuman, The Sartorialist before and it gave a lot of suggestions to the retailer and the social media instruments.  

How has Instagram changed Pitti?

The content of Pitti is much, much more necessary for Instagram than Instagram for Pitti.

What about streetwear?

It will continue to change and jeanswear will come back. 

Do you think the consumer dictates the trends?

The consumer dictates. If they they buy, if they don’t, they don’t buy. It was the same thing to do in Roman times. Nothing has changed. 

You’ve been at Pitti for 30 years. What are some of your most memorable experiences? 

The next one will arrive. Every time we have fantastic experiences. We have had the Karl Lagerfeld exhibition at Pitti Palace. We have had Bob Wilson with Armani in the Leopolda station. It was magical. We had an extraordinary exhibition made with accessories. We had a project where Raf Simons was the curator on adolescence. There have been so many things, so many unique projects. 

What do you see for the future of Pitti?

We are trying to give more space to the small companies with the stronger financial economical or creative strength. Due to the difficulties of the market, it is better for the ones already on the market to offer them more space to promote. We are trying to reduce the number of exhibitors, giving more space to the ones that are already on the market. 

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/abinlot/2020/01/15/ceo-raffaello-napoleone-on-the-evolution-of-pitti-uomo-the-good-international-community-of-menswear-is-here/

Street style: Pitti Uomo 97 for AW20

The Best Street Style From Pitti Uomo Spring/Summer 2020

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Vincenzo Grillo/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Photo by Valentina Valdinoci/IMAXtree.com.

Photo by Martyna Mierzejewska.

Pitti Uomo has been redefining and challenging its existence of late. The seasonal men's fashion fair has deviated somewhat from its sartorial, suit-and-tie formula, and has opened up to include guest designers and brands that don't necessarily delve into any form of tailoring.

This season, the 97th edition of Pitti Uomo will see Luke and Lucie Meier of Jil Sander showcasing the brand's autumn/winter 2020 menswear collection, American unisex brand TELFAR making its Pitti Uomo debut, as well as the first runway presentation of Stefano Pilati's independent Random Identities label. All three different in their own unique ways, and definitely not the typical idea of tailoring.

Yet, the street style at Pitti Uomo is still the go-to for contemporary tailoring albeit at times, mixed in with some sportswear inflections. But if fashion trends are anything to go by, you'd best pay attention to what the Pitti Peacocks are parading in this season.

Scroll through the gallery above to see our daily edit of the best street style looks as seen on the streets of Florence during the 97th edition of Pitti Uomo.

What: Pitti Uomo 97 for the autumn/winter 2020 season
When: 7 – 10 January 2020

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Source: https://www.esquiresg.com/galleries/best-street-style-pitti-uomo-pitti-imagine-menswear-florence-italy/

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